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Access to Information (GIPA)

Your right to information
On 1 July 2010 new right to information legislation came into effect, replacing the former freedom of information law.

  • The new law: 
  • Creates new rights to information that are designed to meet community expectations of more open and transparent government 
  • Encourages government agencies to proactively release government information. 
You can find out more about your right to information and new ways to access NSW government information on the Office of the Information Commissioner (OIC) website at www.ipc.nsw.gov.au or email ipcinfo@ipc.nsw.gov.au


Accessing our agency’s information
Our agency publishes a range of information under the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009. 

Follow the links to find out more about our policies, our agency’s publication guide, a disclosure log of information applications, details of information not disclosed to the public and our register of government contracts.

Files can be downloaded in .pdf format below:


Government Contracts
In accordance with Section 27 of the Government Information (Public Access) Act 2009 (GIPA), Council is required to maintain a register that records information about each government contract which has (or is likely to have) a value of $150,000 or more.

This requirement however, does not apply to contracts entered into by Councils before commencement of the GIPA Act on 1 July 2010. Alternatively, Council may make some of this prior information proactively available within the contracts register.

You can request information on any contract entered into prior to this date by contacting the Right to Information Officer.

Under Section 35 (2)(b) of the Act, Councils are not required to publish their contracts register on the e-tenders website, making this page the centralised location for all current contracts entered into by Council since 1 July 2010.

Contracts that must be included in the government contracts register are those:
  • between an agency and a private sector contractor for a value of $150,000 or more, and involve:
  • the contractor undertaking a specific project such as construction, infrastructure or property development
  • the contractor agreeing to provide specific goods or services
  • the transfer or lease of real property
Employment contracts do not need to be included in the register.


Different classes of contracts
The Act provides for three different classes of contracts, each with different information disclosure requirements.

Class 1 contracts
Class 1 contracts are those that have, or are likely to have, a value of $150,000

Class 2 contracts
Class 2 contracts are class 1 contracts where:
  • there has not been a public tender process and the terms and conditions of the contract have been negotiated directly with the contractor, or
  • the contract was the subject of a tender (whether public or not) but the terms and conditions have been substantially negotiated with the contractor
  • the obligations of one or more parties to maintain or operate infrastructure or assets
  • could continue for 10 years or more, and the contract involves a privately financed project (as defined by Treasury) or the exchange of significant assets.
Class 3 contracts
If a class 2 contract has a value, or likely value of more than $5 million, it becomes a class 3 contract. Agencies must publish a copy of a class 3 contract on the register of government contracts.